anthropoid


anthropoid
anthropoid, anthropomorphic, anthropomorphous all mean resembling man.
Anthropoid in its basic meaning is used primarily of certain apes (as the chimpanzee and gorilla) and certain prehuman primate fossils that approach modern man in structure
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the anthropoid apes of the Miocene

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In extended use the reference to manlike apes rather than man predominates; thus, an anthropoid pelvis is a human pelvis that in shape and proportions resembles that of an anthropoid ape
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the revolutionary thug who has the fine art of bursting Razumov’s eardrums . . . is an anthropoid forerunner of thousands who have gone one better than that in the police states— Pritchett

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Anthropomorphic and the less common anthropomorphous are used interchangeably when implying a physical resemblance to man
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the anthropomorphic deities of primitive peoples

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an anthropomorphous carving

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and both may replace anthropoid in its basic meaning especially when it is desired to avoid taxonomic implications
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anthropomorphous apes— Darwin

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Darwin himself carefully described men and apes as having evolved separately from some common “ancient . . . anthropomorphic subgroup”— High School Biology

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Anthropomorphic is the preferable term to modify a noun denoting something immaterial or to attribute human personality or quality as distinct from human physique
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expectancy is too anthropomorphic a concept . . . its use leads the reader to attribute to animals what in fact only occurs at the level of human beings equipped with language— Charles Morris

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the categories of cause, force, law, are anthropomorphic in origin and were thus originally metaphors— Cohen

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New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Anthropoid — came from the Greek for of human likeness . In biology it is used interchangeably with simian to refer to a primate that is not a lemurid, lorisid, or tarsier. In some cultural representations, namely Edgar Rice Burroughs s Tarzan of the Apes ,… …   Wikipedia

  • Anthropoid — An thro*poid, a. [Gr. ? man + oid.] Resembling man; applied especially to certain apes, as the ourang or gorilla. n. An anthropoid ape. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • anthropoid — [an′thrə poid΄] adj. [Gr anthrōpoeidēs: see ANTHROPO & OID] 1. resembling a human 2. apelike [a brutish man with anthropoid features] n. any of certain highly developed primates, esp. the chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon: in some… …   English World dictionary

  • anthropoid — (adj.) manlike, 1835, from Gk. anthropoeides like a man, resembling a man; in human form; see ANTHROPO (Cf. anthropo ) + IOD (Cf. iod). As a noun, attested from 1832 (the Greek noun in this sense was anthroparion) …   Etymology dictionary

  • anthropoid — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ referring to the higher primates including monkeys, apes, and humans. ORIGIN from Greek anthr pos human being …   English terms dictionary

  • anthropoid — UK [ˈænθrəˌpɔɪd] / US adjective an anthropoid ape or other animal is very similar to a human Derived word: anthropoid UK / US noun countable Word forms anthropoid : singular anthropoid plural anthropoids …   English dictionary

  • anthropoid — 1. Resembling humans in structure and form. 2. One of the monkeys resembling humans; an ape. [G. anthropo eides, man like] * * * an·thro·poid an(t) thrə .pȯid adj 1) resembling humans used esp. of apes of the family Pongidae 2) of the pelvis… …   Medical dictionary

  • anthropoid — an|thro|poid [ˈænθrəpɔıd] adj an anthropoid animal, such as an ↑ape, looks like a human >anthropoid n …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • anthropoid — adjective an anthropoid animal is very like a human anthropoid noun (C) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • anthropoid — noun Etymology: Greek anthrōpoeidēs resembling a human, from anthrōpos Date: 1832 1. any of a suborder (Anthropoidea) of higher primates (as macaques and marmosets); especially ape 1b 2. a person resembling an ape < the howling anthropoids of the …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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